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TALKS

About

Out-Of-Office is an independent, creatively-driven company supporting the arts and advancing dialogue for social change through strategic alliances, collaborative events and international exchange.

Photo courtesy of Aaron Rogosin

 

We want to start conversations that dissect the future.

We believe in the power of inclusive dialogue. In the last year we've organised discussions between innovators from Facebook, MIT, Frog Design, X (The Moonshot Factory), Vitra and more to explore critical topics such as trust and privacy, open access to information, funding scientific research, and the ethical implications of emerging technologies including AI, synbio and gene editing. We love taking today's conversations one step further.

 

Explore past conversations ↓

 Journalist and Wirtschaftswoche publisher Miriam Meckel demonstrates how thoughts and emotions can be tracked in a discussion at me Convention 2017 on leadership in the age of neurocapitalism (photo by Markus Nass).

Journalist and Wirtschaftswoche publisher Miriam Meckel demonstrates how thoughts and emotions can be tracked in a discussion at me Convention 2017 on leadership in the age of neurocapitalism (photo by Markus Nass).

 
 

Misinformation in the public discourse: proactive solutions for a complex problem

me Convention, 2018
Recent events have shown that the algorithms built to satisfy our curiosity are being exploited or used against us, skewing our worldviews and driving political divides. The platforms we rely on to stay connected and learn about the world also expose us to far-reaching disinformation campaigns and privacy risks. How can we advance from being reactionary to creating proactive solutions? 

Renee DiResta
New Knowledge & Data for Democracy

Brit Stakston
Media Strategist, Author & Entrepreneur

Bret Schafer
German Marshall Fund

 
 

The price of security: AI, facial recognition, and the future of policing

me Convention, 2018
AI and other advances are fueling a surge in the use of facial recognition. Law-enforcement officials are identifying criminals by matching images from security cameras, or from social media posts, to large databases of facial images. Meanwhile, officials are starting to experiment with the use of facial recognition at transportation terminals, and at public events such as sports championships, to identify terrorists or other hostile agents. Advocates say that the technology will improve national security and public safety, but others are concerned that facial recognition will usher in an unprecedented assault on privacy and civil liberties. 

 

 

Glenn Zorpette
IEEE Spectrum

Neema Singh Guliani
American Civil Liberties Union

Christopher Lee
Department of Homeland Security